Discussion:
nbc: anyone heard the new jackson browne yet?
(too old to reply)
cwb
2005-10-13 02:31:39 UTC
Permalink
gonna buy it, just wondering how high I can let my expectations
wander...



cwb
(your bright baby blues)
m***@yahoo.com
2005-10-13 02:54:40 UTC
Permalink
I didn't realize he had a new release. Though, I was in a record store
today and read that he had a live 'solo' CD out. Wasn't sure if it was
brand new or now.

Lawless Avenues, Black and White and Till I Go Down are my favs after
all these years. How 'bout yours?
a***@aol.com
2005-10-13 03:18:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by cwb
gonna buy it, just wondering how high I can let my expectations
wander...
No comment ;)

AmyMac
WJM
2005-10-13 10:14:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by cwb
gonna buy it, just wondering how high I can let my expectations
wander...
Track Listings
1. The Barricades Of Heaven
2. These Days
3. The Birds Of St. Marks (never before released!)
4. Fountain Of Sorrow
5. Your Bright Baby Blues
6. For A Dancer
7. Too Many Angels
8. For Everyman
9. Lives In the Balance
10. Looking East
11. The Pretender
12. Take It Easy

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Editorial Reviews
About the Artist
Over the course of more than three decades, Jackson Browne has written and
performed some of the most literate and moving songs in popular music. With
classic albums including Late For The Sky, The Pretender, Running On Empty,
and For Everyman, and songs like "Doctor My Eyes," "Rock Me On The Water,"
and "Lives In The Balance," he has defined a genre of songwriting that is
charged with honesty, emotion and personal politics. Along the way, he has
touched the hearts and minds of countless fans worldwide.

Jackson's artistry was recognized with his 2004 induction into the Rock and
Roll Hall of Fame, the honor eloquently delivered by friend and fellow Hall
of Famer Bruce Springsteen. He also received in 2004 an honorary Doctorate
of Music from Occidental College in Los Angeles, for "a remarkable musical
career that has successfully combined an intensely personal artistry with a
broader vision of social justice."

Browne's latest album release is 2005's Jackson Browne Solo Acoustic Vol. 1,
presenting twelve songs culled from his acclaimed solo acoustic concerts
performed worldwide over the past few years. The disc also captures spirited
and humorous exchanges between Jackson and his audience, making for an
intimate listening experience. Set for release October 11, 2005, Jackson
Browne Solo Acoustic Vol. 1 is Inside Recordings' inaugural release under
its direct distribution deal with ADA. Presenting twelve songs culled from
Browne's extensive and critically acclaimed solo acoustic concerts around
the world over the past few years, the disc also captures both spirited and
humorous exchanges between Jackson and his audiences, making for a truly
intimate listening experience. This new compilation, produced by Jackson
Browne and Paul Dieter, is his first live release since his 1977
multi-platinum album Running On Empty. Jackson Browne Solo Acoustic Vol. 1
also marks the recording debut! of a song more than three decades old, "The
Birds Of St. Marks," not previously released in any form. Featuring solo
performances on both guitar and piano, the album's track listing reaches
back to Browne's early years with "These Days" and "Take It Easy," and spans
his entire career with other highlights including "Fountain Of Sorrow," "For
Everyman," "The Pretender" and "Looking East." A stirring live version of
"Lives In The Balance," the title track from Jackson's powerful 1986 album,
will be the new album's lead single.

Album Description
Presenting twelve songs culled from Browne's extensive and critically
acclaimed solo acoustic concerts around the world over the past few years,
the disc also captures both spirited and humorous exchanges between Jackson
and his audiences, making for a truly intimate listening experience. This
new comp, produced by Browne and Paul Dieter, is Jackson's first live
release since his 1977 multi-platinum "Running On Empty" album. It also
marks the recording debut of a three decades old track, "The Birds Of St.
Marks", not previously released in any form. "Solo Acoustic" reaches back to
Browne's early years with "These Days" and "Take It Easy", and spans his
entire career with other highlights such as "Fountain Of Sorrow", "For
Everyman", "The Pretender", and "Looking East". A stirring version of "Lives
In The Balance", the title track from Jackson's powerful 1986 album, will be
this record's lead single.
William Longyard
2005-10-13 11:01:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by WJM
Over the course of more than three decades, Jackson Browne has written and
performed some of the most literate and moving songs in popular music.
I can't think of one JB song that is even in the same league with what Bruce
writes. JB writes earnest poetry, Springsteen writes inspired masterpieces.

Bill Longyard
Paul Mcdermott
2005-10-13 11:07:42 UTC
Permalink
Sky Blue...
Post by William Longyard
Post by WJM
Over the course of more than three decades, Jackson Browne has written and
performed some of the most literate and moving songs in popular music.
I can't think of one JB song that is even in the same league with what
Bruce writes. JB writes earnest poetry, Springsteen writes inspired
masterpieces.
Bill Longyard
imsjry
2005-10-13 13:57:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by William Longyard
Post by WJM
Over the course of more than three decades, Jackson Browne has written and
performed some of the most literate and moving songs in popular music.
I can't think of one JB song that is even in the same league with what Bruce
writes. JB writes earnest poetry, Springsteen writes inspired masterpieces.
Bill Longyard
And nothing Bruce writes can touch Dylan. What is your point?? Browne
is a major talent and one of the best singer-songwriters of all time.
Robert Wiersema
2005-10-13 14:08:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by imsjry
Post by William Longyard
Post by WJM
Over the course of more than three decades, Jackson Browne has written and
performed some of the most literate and moving songs in popular music.
I can't think of one JB song that is even in the same league with what Bruce
writes. JB writes earnest poetry, Springsteen writes inspired masterpieces.
Bill Longyard
And nothing Bruce writes can touch Dylan.
I dunno - I'd take 57 Channels over Wiggle Wiggle any day.
Henry Porter
2005-10-13 15:11:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Wiersema
Post by imsjry
And nothing Bruce writes can touch Dylan.
I dunno - I'd take 57 Channels over Wiggle Wiggle any day.
Yeah, but within the genre of songs written circa 1990 about television, TV
Talkin' Song blows away 57 Channels (almost literally).

HP
imsjry
2005-10-13 15:26:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Wiersema
Post by imsjry
Post by William Longyard
Post by WJM
Over the course of more than three decades, Jackson Browne has written and
performed some of the most literate and moving songs in popular music.
I can't think of one JB song that is even in the same league with what Bruce
writes. JB writes earnest poetry, Springsteen writes inspired masterpieces.
Bill Longyard
And nothing Bruce writes can touch Dylan.
Touche'
Post by Robert Wiersema
I dunno - I'd take 57 Channels over Wiggle Wiggle any day.
ruth
2005-10-13 21:40:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by imsjry
Post by William Longyard
Post by WJM
Over the course of more than three decades, Jackson Browne has written and
performed some of the most literate and moving songs in popular music.
I can't think of one JB song that is even in the same league with what Bruce
writes. JB writes earnest poetry, Springsteen writes inspired masterpieces.
Bill Longyard
And nothing Bruce writes can touch Dylan. What is your point??
I disagree. I ...oh God here it goes.. consider Dylan overrated as a
poet.


Browne
Post by imsjry
is a major talent and one of the best singer-songwriters of all time.
Not so much.

Ruth, ducking and running away really really fast.
--
William Longyard
2005-10-14 02:31:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by ruth
Post by imsjry
And nothing Bruce writes can touch Dylan. What is your point??
I disagree. I ...oh God here it goes.. consider Dylan overrated as a
poet.
I completely agree, Ruth. Dylan wrote some great, but also a lot of crap.
Bruce consistently writes brilliantly and always more incisively.

Bill Longyard
Dan
2005-10-14 02:48:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by William Longyard
Post by ruth
Post by imsjry
And nothing Bruce writes can touch Dylan. What is your point??
I disagree. I ...oh God here it goes.. consider Dylan overrated as a
poet.
I completely agree, Ruth. Dylan wrote some great, but also a lot of crap.
Bruce consistently writes brilliantly and always more incisively.
Bill Longyard
I think an argument can be made that Dylan's first seven album run from
Freewheelin' through Blonde is perhaps the most consistently good series
of albums anybody has ever released.

There are a few rough spots in the 70s and 80s.

He has recovered nicely with the last two.
--
Dan

"There's no devil, just God when he drinks."
--Tom Waits
Karen Burns
2005-10-14 02:54:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dan
"There's no devil, just God when he drinks."
--Tom Waits
He *must* be related to my mother.... <evil grin and chuckling here>
Mystic
2005-10-14 03:42:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dan
There are a few rough spots in the 70s and 80s.
Rough spots? "John Wesley Harding" "New Morning"........
Materpieces in my opinion.......

-Mystic
Dan
2005-10-14 03:47:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mystic
Post by Dan
There are a few rough spots in the 70s and 80s.
Rough spots? "John Wesley Harding" "New Morning"........
Materpieces in my opinion.......
-Mystic
I was thinking more along the lines of Dylan, Planet Waves, and Slow
Train coming, which were not as top notch as some...among others.

And I think you can add Blood on the Tracks to the masterpiece list. I
also like Street Legal and Infidels.

But I really place some of those early albums...Freewheelin', Blonde,
Times They Are A'changing etc. on such a lofty level that even some
masterpieces do not reach their heights. I think they are one of the
high-water marks in the arts for the 20th Century. YMMV.
--
Dan

"There's no devil, just God when he drinks."
--Tom Waits
William Innes
2005-10-14 03:59:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mystic
Post by Dan
There are a few rough spots in the 70s and 80s.
Rough spots? "John Wesley Harding" "New Morning"........
Materpieces in my opinion.......
-Mystic
I was thinking more along the lines of Dylan, Planet Waves, and Slow Train
coming, which were not as top notch as some...among others.
And I think you can add Blood on the Tracks to the masterpiece list. I
also like Street Legal and Infidels.
But I really place some of those early albums...Freewheelin', Blonde,
Times They Are A'changing etc. on such a lofty level that even some
masterpieces do not reach their heights. I think they are one of the
high-water marks in the arts for the 20th Century. YMMV.
If one can be objective enough to separate one's own personal
religious/spiritual values & beliefs (or lack of either, which is fine
also), then I think SLOW TRAIN COMING really is a masterpiece. The
performances are nothing short of breath-taking ."When He Returns" has to be
one of Dylan's finest vocal performances EVER.
The production values are wonderful, as is the stellar musicianship on the
part of those who played on that album.
Song such as "Slow Train" and "Precious Angel" and "I Believe in You"
deliver some of Dylan's most memorable and pointed imagery that he's ever
penned.
I'm far from a holy-roller...but I love a good gospel performance...and SLOW
TRAIN COMING delivers the goods (and the covers...as done by many a renowned
gospel performer on the tribute-album GOTTA SERVE SOMEBODY...really does
show just how well Dylan mastered this form of music).
SLOW TRAIN COMING, me thinks, often gets an unfair shake...and often a
critique that is not free from prejudice...based on much of its subject
matter.
It is as fine an album as any that Dylan has ever penned/performed.
Song for song, it is probably a hundred times stronger than either PLANET
WAVES, INFIDELS or NEW MORNING.
Robert Wiersema
2005-10-14 04:20:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by William Innes
Post by Dan
Post by Mystic
Post by Dan
There are a few rough spots in the 70s and 80s.
Rough spots? "John Wesley Harding" "New Morning"........
Materpieces in my opinion.......
-Mystic
I was thinking more along the lines of Dylan, Planet Waves, and Slow
Train coming, which were not as top notch as some...among others.
And I think you can add Blood on the Tracks to the masterpiece list. I
also like Street Legal and Infidels.
But I really place some of those early albums...Freewheelin', Blonde,
Times They Are A'changing etc. on such a lofty level that even some
masterpieces do not reach their heights. I think they are one of the
high-water marks in the arts for the 20th Century. YMMV.
If one can be objective enough to separate one's own personal
religious/spiritual values & beliefs (or lack of either, which is fine
also), then I think SLOW TRAIN COMING really is a masterpiece. The
performances are nothing short of breath-taking ."When He Returns" has to
be one of Dylan's finest vocal performances EVER.
Yup.
Post by William Innes
The production values are wonderful, as is the stellar musicianship on the
part of those who played on that album.
Song such as "Slow Train" and "Precious Angel" and "I Believe in You"
deliver some of Dylan's most memorable and pointed imagery that he's ever
penned.
I'm far from a holy-roller...but I love a good gospel performance...and
SLOW TRAIN COMING delivers the goods (and the covers...as done by many a
renowned gospel performer on the tribute-album GOTTA SERVE
SOMEBODY...really does show just how well Dylan mastered this form of
music).
SLOW TRAIN COMING, me thinks, often gets an unfair shake...and often a
critique that is not free from prejudice...based on much of its subject
matter.
It is as fine an album as any that Dylan has ever penned/performed.
Song for song, it is probably a hundred times stronger than either PLANET
WAVES, INFIDELS or NEW MORNING.
Yup to all of the above.
ruth
2005-10-15 03:04:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by William Innes
If one can be objective enough to separate one's own personal
religious/spiritual values & beliefs (or lack of either, which is fine
also), then I think SLOW TRAIN COMING really is a masterpiece. The
performances are nothing short of breath-taking ."When He Returns" has to be
one of Dylan's finest vocal performances EVER.
The production values are wonderful, as is the stellar musicianship on the
part of those who played on that album.
Song such as "Slow Train" and "Precious Angel" and "I Believe in You"
deliver some of Dylan's most memorable and pointed imagery that he's ever
penned.
I'm far from a holy-roller...but I love a good gospel performance...and SLOW
TRAIN COMING delivers the goods (and the covers...as done by many a renowned
gospel performer on the tribute-album GOTTA SERVE SOMEBODY...really does
show just how well Dylan mastered this form of music).
I assume we have probably already talked about this in the past( I have
no memory), Billy, but did you see any of the Warfield Slow Train shows
in SF? They were incredible. Amazing amazing stuff...especially
compared to that "phone it in tour" in 78 . I love Slow Train and I am
about as non -religious as one gets. The man was on fire then... I don't
get it but I sure did enjoy it. I went to three of the shows.
Originally got tickets for just one and then went wild and bought two
more after that. Great great shows.
--
William Innes
2005-10-15 04:08:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by ruth
Post by William Innes
If one can be objective enough to separate one's own personal
religious/spiritual values & beliefs (or lack of either, which is fine
also), then I think SLOW TRAIN COMING really is a masterpiece. The
performances are nothing short of breath-taking ."When He Returns" has to be
one of Dylan's finest vocal performances EVER.
The production values are wonderful, as is the stellar musicianship on the
part of those who played on that album.
Song such as "Slow Train" and "Precious Angel" and "I Believe in You"
deliver some of Dylan's most memorable and pointed imagery that he's ever
penned.
I'm far from a holy-roller...but I love a good gospel performance...and SLOW
TRAIN COMING delivers the goods (and the covers...as done by many a renowned
gospel performer on the tribute-album GOTTA SERVE SOMEBODY...really does
show just how well Dylan mastered this form of music).
I assume we have probably already talked about this in the past( I have
no memory), Billy, but did you see any of the Warfield Slow Train shows
in SF? They were incredible. Amazing amazing stuff...especially
compared to that "phone it in tour" in 78 . I love Slow Train and I am
about as non -religious as one gets. The man was on fire then... I don't
get it but I sure did enjoy it. I went to three of the shows.
Originally got tickets for just one and then went wild and bought two
more after that. Great great shows.
Oh, yes, indeed I caught one of his Warfield shows just after SLOW TRAIN
COMING was released.
It is amongst the handful of the most inspired, fiery and brilliant
performances I've ever seen by anyone.
I think the mumbling disgruntled folks in attendance didn't fully appreciate
what they were seeing.
Those shows were as inspired and as passionate as live music gets.
Those who felt as though Dylan had somehow betrayed them by 1) tackling a
theme...Born Again Christianity..one that isn't going to win over a lot of
folks and 2) not playing any of his songs written prior to SLOW TRAIN
COMING....well, the irony is that they are very much akin to that dude who
yells out "Judas!" before Dylan launches into "Like a Rolling Stone" at his
Manchester concert in 1966.
In short, they became the very thing that they scoffed for so many years.

The other inspired performances that I'd list would be:

1) Springsteen at Winterland
2) the tuba or trombone player (I think it was tuba) who sang an ethereal
version of "Just a Closer Walk with Thee" at the Preservation Jazz Hall on
St. Peter's Street in New Orleans
3) the moment Itzhak Perlman lifted his bow to his violin and began playing
the first violin part of a Bach piece
4) Warren Zevon doing "Veracruz" and "Frank and Jesse James" solo at the
piano
5) Dylan at the Warfield in 1979 and Dylan at the Bill Graham Civic Center
just a bit over a month after 9/11/01...that show felt like APOCALYPSE NOW.

Honorable mention: Jackson Browne honoring my shouted request to play "For
Everyman"

there are dozens of others, but those come immediately to mind.
Burton Busk
2005-10-15 11:23:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by William Innes
Post by ruth
I assume we have probably already talked about this in the past( I have
no memory), Billy, but did you see any of the Warfield Slow Train shows
in SF? They were incredible. Amazing amazing stuff...especially
compared to that "phone it in tour" in 78 . I love Slow Train and I am
about as non -religious as one gets. The man was on fire then... I don't
get it but I sure did enjoy it. I went to three of the shows.
Originally got tickets for just one and then went wild and bought two
more after that. Great great shows.
Oh, yes, indeed I caught one of his Warfield shows just after SLOW TRAIN
COMING was released.
It is amongst the handful of the most inspired, fiery and brilliant
performances I've ever seen by anyone.
I think the mumbling disgruntled folks in attendance didn't fully appreciate
what they were seeing.
Those shows were as inspired and as passionate as live music gets.
Those who felt as though Dylan had somehow betrayed them by 1) tackling a
theme...Born Again Christianity..one that isn't going to win over a lot of
folks and 2) not playing any of his songs written prior to SLOW TRAIN
COMING....well, the irony is that they are very much akin to that dude who
yells out "Judas!" before Dylan launches into "Like a Rolling Stone" at his
Manchester concert in 1966.
In short, they became the very thing that they scoffed for so many years.
I was going through some unlabelled cassette tapes a while back, and one of
them was a tape I'd made of a random KSAN broadcast on a Sunday morning in
1978. It happened to be from a couple days after Dylan's first Slow Train
Coming Warfield show, and the DJ (the great news broadcaster Dave McQueen
happened to be DJing that morning) read the Chronicle review of the show, I
think Joel Selvin was the critic. It was scathing, to put it mildly. I don't
think I've ever heard such a bad review from Selvin. And from what I
remember, the general consensus was about the same. Yeah, I think the Jesus
factor must have been what turned off most people --- even though the music
was good, the concept was not hip, and as we know, tragically hip was king
in the Bay Area in those days. So I think it's neat that you and Ruth both
loved the shows, despite the consensus. You two were ahead of your time! "If
you're really hip, the passing years will show" ...
Post by William Innes
1) Springsteen at Winterland
You were there? I hadn't heard that ... ;-)
ruth
2005-10-15 03:01:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dan
Post by Mystic
Post by Dan
There are a few rough spots in the 70s and 80s.
Rough spots? "John Wesley Harding" "New Morning"........
Materpieces in my opinion.......
-Mystic
I was thinking more along the lines of Dylan, Planet Waves, and Slow
Train coming, which were not as top notch as some...among others.
And I think you can add Blood on the Tracks to the masterpiece list. I
also like Street Legal and Infidels.
But I really place some of those early albums...Freewheelin', Blonde,
Times They Are A'changing etc. on such a lofty level that even some
masterpieces do not reach their heights. I think they are one of the
high-water marks in the arts for the 20th Century. YMMV.
I loved Dylan through JWH . I was in love with him when I was a youth. I
And then again for Blood on The Tracks. And I totally enjoyed Slow
Train. My husband plays him incessantly though. I sometimes scream " The
Man Sings Like A Hound" and go and put on Sinatra in defense. A lot of
the time he just pisses me off though.. that fashionable cynical thing
and studied mystery just annoyed me. I used to love guys who thought
they were Dylan. They all turned out to be self involved assholes. Maybe
that is the problem.
--
Gumboman
2005-10-15 04:34:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by ruth
I sometimes scream " The
Man Sings Like A Hound" and go and put on Sinatra in defense.
Put on a little Dean Martin for a change of pace.


JH
Zeke
2005-10-15 07:18:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gumboman
Put on a little Dean Martin for a change of pace.
Going Back To Houston!


==================================
Better bring your own redemption when you come
To the barricades of Heaven, where I'm from
Jackson Browne
Burton Busk
2005-10-15 11:38:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Zeke
Post by Gumboman
Put on a little Dean Martin for a change of pace.
Going Back To Houston!
No no it's "Go-na back-a to-a Houston ...."

(I'm gelling)
Gumboman
2005-10-15 14:45:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Zeke
Post by Gumboman
Put on a little Dean Martin for a change of pace.
Going Back To Houston!
I LOVE that song :)


JH
ruth
2005-10-15 18:49:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gumboman
Post by ruth
I sometimes scream " The
Man Sings Like A Hound" and go and put on Sinatra in defense.
Put on a little Dean Martin for a change of pace.
JH
bleeecchhhhhh.
--

William Innes
2005-10-14 03:34:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by ruth
Post by imsjry
Post by William Longyard
Post by WJM
Over the course of more than three decades, Jackson Browne has written and
performed some of the most literate and moving songs in popular music.
I can't think of one JB song that is even in the same league with what Bruce
writes. JB writes earnest poetry, Springsteen writes inspired masterpieces.
Bill Longyard
And nothing Bruce writes can touch Dylan. What is your point??
I disagree. I ...oh God here it goes.. consider Dylan overrated as a
poet.
Browne
Post by imsjry
is a major talent and one of the best singer-songwriters of all time.
Not so much.
Ruth, ducking and running away really really fast.
--
Don't duck, don't run.
I think Dylan would be the first to agree with you...
Susan
2005-10-13 14:32:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by William Longyard
JB writes earnest poetry, Springsteen writes inspired masterpieces.
like this? : lol..............

I'm waitin', waitin' on a sunny day
Gonna chase the clouds away
Waitin' on a sunny day


Browne and Springsteen are both earnest poets. It's more the
difference between a Neruda and a Ginsburg, and how they'll effect one
person at the core of their being and leave another cold.

(have a lot more to say, but gotta roll off to Responsibility Land
soon)

also, I'd say there's a very strong argument that Browne's gift of
putting the right musicians together (or going it solo) for every phase
of his musical life and every song, is FAR more versatile, daring and
non-ego driven than Bruce's abilities in that area. (see the
discussions about Bruce solo and Bruce w/ other players here recently)
Bruce could learn a thing or two from Jackson in that realm,
nodoubtaboutit.

imo etc,
susan
Zeke
2005-10-13 15:35:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by William Longyard
I can't think of one JB song that is even in the same league with what
Bruce writes. JB writes earnest poetry, Springsteen writes inspired
masterpieces.
Once again you're wrong.


----------------------------------------------------------
Better bring your own redemption when you come
To the barricades of Heaven, where I'm from
Jackson Browne
ruth
2005-10-13 21:39:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Zeke
Post by William Longyard
I can't think of one JB song that is even in the same league with what
Bruce writes. JB writes earnest poetry, Springsteen writes inspired
masterpieces.
Once again you're wrong.
Actually, although it pains me to say so.... I agree with Longyard.
--
Zeke
2005-10-13 21:52:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by ruth
Actually, although it pains me to say so.... I agree with Longyard.
On everything?

-----------------------------------------------------------
Better bring your own redemption when you come
To the barricades of Heaven, where I'm from
Jackson Browne
ruth
2005-10-13 22:57:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Zeke
Post by ruth
Actually, although it pains me to say so.... I agree with Longyard.
On everything?
Nope....just on Springsteen being a better songwriter than JB. But you
knew that , right? Or did you think I had gone even crazier than I
already am?
--
Zeke
2005-10-13 23:21:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by ruth
just on Springsteen being a better songwriter than JB. But you
knew that , right?
I think they're like beer or wine. (Not whine!).

Both great, just depends on your mood.

However one can never be the other.

And yes, I knew what your sentence really meant.


-----------------------------------------------------------
Better bring your own redemption when you come
To the barricades of Heaven, where I'm from
Jackson Browne
Susan
2005-10-13 23:50:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Zeke
Post by ruth
just on Springsteen being a better songwriter than JB. But you
knew that , right?
I think they're like beer or wine. (Not whine!).
Both great, just depends on your mood.
However one can never be the other.
and that's the beauty of it, if you like them both. they're not just
more of the same, they compliment each other like cheese and crackers,
beer and pizza, sex and cigarettes, abott and costello, or cats and
dogs.

or to summarize, I'd rather pull my toenails out individually with
tweezers than pick which one was more important for me over the last 35
years.

susan
ruth
2005-10-14 01:46:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Susan
Post by Zeke
Post by ruth
just on Springsteen being a better songwriter than JB. But you
knew that , right?
I think they're like beer or wine. (Not whine!).
Both great, just depends on your mood.
However one can never be the other.
and that's the beauty of it, if you like them both. they're not just
more of the same, they compliment each other like cheese and crackers,
beer and pizza, sex and cigarettes, abott and costello, or cats and
dogs.
hmmmm.......Peter and Gordon? Chad and Jeremy? uh......why am I having a
hard time thinking of witty duos at the moment?
--
Ken Ream
2005-10-13 23:34:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by ruth
Post by Zeke
Post by ruth
Actually, although it pains me to say so.... I agree with Longyard.
On everything?
Nope....just on Springsteen being a better songwriter than JB. But you
knew that , right? Or did you think I had gone even crazier than I
already am?
As measured by their last release of new material, I will agree
Springsteen currently is the better songwriter. I'm a big Jackson
Browne fan, but I have to say he's been in a fallow period for a few
years now. But I'll put Jackson's best songwriting work up against
Bruce's anyday and Jackson will come out on top for my money.

Fortunately I don't have to choose only one.

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William Longyard
2005-10-14 02:35:20 UTC
Permalink
Browne couldn't even come close to Racin' in the Street, Price You Pay,
Darkness, or Backstreets. However, Browne is always earnest. Kind of like
Edward Herman is an actor.

Bill Longyard
William Innes
2005-10-14 03:50:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by William Longyard
Browne couldn't even come close to Racin' in the Street, Price You Pay,
Darkness, or Backstreets. However, Browne is always earnest. Kind of
like Edward Herman is an actor.
In turn, though, I don't think Springsteen could quite so eloquently
articulate a lot of what Browne has managed to convey in his songs.
Really, I think we're talking about one person being on a rugby field while
the other person is on a basketball court.
Two different cats with two different approaches.
Common ground...they've appeared together and Landau produced Browne's THE
PRETENDER album.
Other than that, we're dealing with two different musical universes....
Dan
2005-10-14 03:53:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by William Innes
Post by William Longyard
Browne couldn't even come close to Racin' in the Street, Price You Pay,
Darkness, or Backstreets. However, Browne is always earnest. Kind of
like Edward Herman is an actor.
In turn, though, I don't think Springsteen could quite so eloquently
articulate a lot of what Browne has managed to convey in his songs.
Really, I think we're talking about one person being on a rugby field while
the other person is on a basketball court.
Two different cats with two different approaches.
Common ground...they've appeared together and Landau produced Browne's THE
PRETENDER album.
Other than that, we're dealing with two different musical universes....
For what it is worth, and I will probably get shot for saying this---I
like "For America" a whole lot more than "Born In The USA."
--
Dan

"There's no devil, just God when he drinks."
--Tom Waits
William Innes
2005-10-14 04:00:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dan
Post by William Innes
Post by William Longyard
Browne couldn't even come close to Racin' in the Street, Price You Pay,
Darkness, or Backstreets. However, Browne is always earnest. Kind of
like Edward Herman is an actor.
In turn, though, I don't think Springsteen could quite so eloquently
articulate a lot of what Browne has managed to convey in his songs.
Really, I think we're talking about one person being on a rugby field
while the other person is on a basketball court.
Two different cats with two different approaches.
Common ground...they've appeared together and Landau produced Browne's
THE PRETENDER album.
Other than that, we're dealing with two different musical universes....
For what it is worth, and I will probably get shot for saying this---I
like "For America" a whole lot more than "Born In The USA."
No shots fired by me...after all, we do want to see you reach your 41st
birthday <g>.
"For America" is a wonderful song.
I think "Born in the USA" is probably a bit more intense and powerful...but
I'd just as soon live in a world that has "For America" than a world that
was without that song.
ruth
2005-10-15 02:56:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by William Innes
Post by William Longyard
Browne couldn't even come close to Racin' in the Street, Price You Pay,
Darkness, or Backstreets. However, Browne is always earnest. Kind of
like Edward Herman is an actor.
In turn, though, I don't think Springsteen could quite so eloquently
articulate a lot of what Browne has managed to convey in his songs.
Really, I think we're talking about one person being on a rugby field while
the other person is on a basketball court.
Two different cats with two different approaches.
Common ground...they've appeared together and Landau produced Browne's THE
PRETENDER album.
Other than that, we're dealing with two different musical universes....
Browne uses too many words. He is the kind of songwriter who would
probably use the word "relationship" in a song and mean it seriously.
And he always seemed so damned white bread and yes, earnest , to me. I
love Zevon though...much edgier.

But I love Edward Herman.
--
William Innes
2005-10-15 03:15:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by ruth
Post by William Innes
Post by William Longyard
Browne couldn't even come close to Racin' in the Street, Price You Pay,
Darkness, or Backstreets. However, Browne is always earnest. Kind of
like Edward Herman is an actor.
In turn, though, I don't think Springsteen could quite so eloquently
articulate a lot of what Browne has managed to convey in his songs.
Really, I think we're talking about one person being on a rugby field while
the other person is on a basketball court.
Two different cats with two different approaches.
Common ground...they've appeared together and Landau produced Browne's THE
PRETENDER album.
Other than that, we're dealing with two different musical universes....
Browne uses too many words. He is the kind of songwriter who would
probably use the word "relationship" in a song and mean it seriously.
And he always seemed so damned white bread and yes, earnest , to me. I
love Zevon though...much edgier.
But I love Edward Herman.
--
I think I'd give the nod to Zevon for the very reason that you
mention...much edgier.
And that is a quality that I've always loved about Zevon's music.

As for Browne using too many words...there have been times when, for sure,
that's a pretty sound claim.
Then again, when he uses words sparingly...and songs such as "These Days" or
"Sleep's Dark & Silent Gate" would be two fine examples...he really does
manage to pack an emotional wallop.
Zeke
2005-10-15 07:10:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by ruth
Browne uses too many words. He is the kind of songwriter who would
probably use the word "relationship" in a song and mean it seriously.
And he always seemed so damned white bread and yes, earnest
Now that's just silly. If anyone is guilty of large word clunk it's Mr.
Hydriotic Acid himself. The closest thing to Jackson Browne is Paul Simon
and yea... they're both fantastic.


===================================
Better bring your own redemption when you come
To the barricades of Heaven, where I'm from
Jackson Browne
Susan
2005-10-15 14:16:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Zeke
Post by ruth
Browne uses too many words. He is the kind of songwriter who would
probably use the word "relationship" in a song and mean it seriously.
And he always seemed so damned white bread and yes, earnest
Now that's just silly. If anyone is guilty of large word clunk it's Mr.
Hydriotic Acid himself.
yeah, but at least he's (occasionally) self aware:

"As I listened that
night I knew that this guy was simply one of the best. Each song was
like a diamond and my first thought was 'damn, he's good.' My second
thought was 'I need less words.' "

-Bruce Springsteen, describing Jackson Browne in his r-n-r hall of foam
induction speech
Gumboman
2005-10-14 04:11:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by William Longyard
Browne couldn't even come close to Racin' in the Street,
Explain this to me. What is so great about this song?


JH
William Innes
2005-10-14 04:03:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gumboman
Post by William Longyard
Browne couldn't even come close to Racin' in the Street,
Explain this to me. What is so great about this song?
I could easily write a tome about this song.
But I'll spare y'all by not doing so.

If I had to pare it down to a sentence or two, I'd say this: It's the song
where we witnessed Springsteen go from being a young man to becoming a
full-fledged adult.
Gumboman
2005-10-14 05:14:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by William Innes
Post by Gumboman
Post by William Longyard
Browne couldn't even come close to Racin' in the Street,
Explain this to me. What is so great about this song?
I could easily write a tome about this song.
But I'll spare y'all by not doing so.
If I had to pare it down to a sentence or two, I'd say this: It's the
song where we witnessed Springsteen go from being a young man to becoming
a full-fledged adult.
I understand why you say that but I just think some of his imagery becomes
dated with time and the songs don't seem to age well - if you know what I
mean.


JH
William Innes
2005-10-14 05:25:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gumboman
Post by William Innes
Post by Gumboman
Post by William Longyard
Browne couldn't even come close to Racin' in the Street,
Explain this to me. What is so great about this song?
I could easily write a tome about this song.
But I'll spare y'all by not doing so.
If I had to pare it down to a sentence or two, I'd say this: It's the
song where we witnessed Springsteen go from being a young man to becoming
a full-fledged adult.
I understand why you say that but I just think some of his imagery becomes
dated with time and the songs don't seem to age well - if you know what I
mean.
Oh, I do know what you mean.
And, as a 15 year old kid, he sounded very adult-like and very grown-up and
mature to me.
Looking back, though, there certainly is something of a naiveté to a lot of
the material from this era (including this song, lovely as it is).
Gumboman
2005-10-14 12:08:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by William Innes
Post by Gumboman
I understand why you say that but I just think some of his imagery
becomes dated with time and the songs don't seem to age well - if you
know what I mean.
Oh, I do know what you mean.
And, as a 15 year old kid, he sounded very adult-like and very grown-up
and mature to me.
Looking back, though, there certainly is something of a naiveté to a lot
of the material from this era (including this song, lovely as it is).
Yea, the song/music is great but the lyrics, over time,
.......................



JH
ruth
2005-10-15 02:54:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by William Innes
Post by Gumboman
I understand why you say that but I just think some of his imagery becomes
dated with time and the songs don't seem to age well - if you know what I
mean.
Oh, I do know what you mean.
And, as a 15 year old kid, he sounded very adult-like and very grown-up and
mature to me.
Looking back, though, there certainly is something of a naiveté to a lot of
the material from this era (including this song, lovely as it is).
I heard this song first as an adult. And I think I immediately
recognized it for what it was. I never took it literally .I never
thought it was about guys and cars. I think it is brilliant and
heartbreaking . And I don't think that imagery is dated at all. Not at
all. Not anymore than "Dancing in the Streets" is. The important thing
to remember is that racing is not dancing. Racing is about desperation.
--
ruth
2005-10-15 02:49:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by William Innes
Post by Gumboman
Post by William Longyard
Browne couldn't even come close to Racin' in the Street,
Explain this to me. What is so great about this song?
I could easily write a tome about this song.
But I'll spare y'all by not doing so.
If I had to pare it down to a sentence or two, I'd say this: It's the song
where we witnessed Springsteen go from being a young man to becoming a
full-fledged adult.
That does just fine.
--
Zeke
2005-10-14 06:00:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gumboman
Post by William Longyard
Browne couldn't even come close to Racin' in the Street,
Explain this to me. What is so great about this song?
I could if I thought it were truly great. I think "most" of it's truly
great. The opening lyrics. The ending lyrics. The overall music. The
piano coda. Even Max's rim shots. But the middle lyrics, oy!

Specifically this part:

But now there's wrinkles around my baby's eyes
And she cries herself to sleep at night
When I come home the house is dark
She sighs "Baby did you make it all right"
She sits on the porch of her daddy's house
But all her pretty dreams are torn
She stares off alone into the night
With the eyes of one who hates for just being born

Dreary, depressing, tired, world weary. They totally remind me of a girl I
grew up with. Junkie brothers, moron sisters, always trying to help and
getting into very bad situations. So the lyrics itself are true, not
"false" in any way. (In my case the girl wasn't a hater. She got
constantly kicked but never hated like the girl in the song. But she was
very fatalistic and ultimately that's what kept her down).

Anyway, I guess at end of day these lyrics are just too freaking depressing
for me.

The song improves dramatically with the next stanza (about all the shutdown
strangers, which of course includes the girl so there's an argument both are
necessary).

Anyway, at least it's not a large part of the song that I don't like. But I
rarely play RITS for others (i.e. in my car). Most non Bruce fans already
think Bruce writes depressing songs. Those lyrics could make them slit
their wrists!


-----------------------------------------------------------
Better bring your own redemption when you come
To the barricades of Heaven, where I'm from
Jackson Browne
Gumboman
2005-10-14 12:15:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Zeke
Post by Gumboman
Post by William Longyard
Browne couldn't even come close to Racin' in the Street,
Explain this to me. What is so great about this song?
I could if I thought it were truly great. I think "most" of it's truly
great. The opening lyrics. The ending lyrics. The overall music. The
piano coda. Even Max's rim shots. But the middle lyrics, oy!
But now there's wrinkles around my baby's eyes
And she cries herself to sleep at night
When I come home the house is dark
She sighs "Baby did you make it all right"
She sits on the porch of her daddy's house
But all her pretty dreams are torn
She stares off alone into the night
With the eyes of one who hates for just being born
Dreary, depressing, tired, world weary. They totally remind me of a girl
I grew up with. Junkie brothers, moron sisters, always trying to help and
getting into very bad situations. So the lyrics itself are true, not
"false" in any way. (In my case the girl wasn't a hater. She got
constantly kicked but never hated like the girl in the song. But she was
very fatalistic and ultimately that's what kept her down).
Anyway, I guess at end of day these lyrics are just too freaking
depressing for me.
The song improves dramatically with the next stanza (about all the
shutdown strangers, which of course includes the girl so there's an
argument both are necessary).
Anyway, at least it's not a large part of the song that I don't like. But
I rarely play RITS for others (i.e. in my car). Most non Bruce fans
already think Bruce writes depressing songs. Those lyrics could make them
slit their wrists!
Maybe you're right - it's too damn depressing. I guess it wouldn't be so bad
if it wasn't all wrapped up in that car business....................

Make them slit their wrists - funny..........

How much Bruce do you play in the car these days?



JH
jnjmitch
2005-10-14 14:01:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Zeke
The song improves dramatically with the next stanza (about all the shutdown
strangers, which of course includes the girl so there's an argument both are
necessary).
I don't know- by the last line, he's up to his old tricks again of
racing in the street. How long do you think she's going to put up with
that before she's back on her daddy's porch?

To me, RITS is like The Godfather- dark and depressing, but in a
brilliant way. You're getting a glimpse into someone's soul- your
own?- with them. I can't listen/watch too often, but when I do, it's a
transcendent experience.
Zeke
2005-10-14 14:56:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by jnjmitch
I don't know- by the last line, he's up to his old tricks again of
racing in the street. How long do you think she's going to put up with
that before she's back on her daddy's porch?
And that's another problem, what's she doing living w/her daddy?
Wasn't he like 28 or something when he wrote that song?

-----------------------------------------------------------
Better bring your own redemption when you come
To the barricades of Heaven, where I'm from
Jackson Browne
jnjmitch
2005-10-14 21:28:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Zeke
Post by jnjmitch
I don't know- by the last line, he's up to his old tricks again of
racing in the street. How long do you think she's going to put up with
that before she's back on her daddy's porch?
And that's another problem, what's she doing living w/her daddy?
Wasn't he like 28 or something when he wrote that song?
She doesn't sound like much of a catch- she left some dude from LA for
no other reason than because she met a different guy with a faster car,
she's prone to fits of melancholia until he gives up his hobbies for
her, and she does little else but sit on the porch where she lives as
an adult child with her father, whom she still refers to as "daddy".
No wonder he wants to spend the rest of his summer racing in the
street. She'd better be careful, because Bobby's ex-wife up the block
might start looking pretty good. (At least he doesn't have a yackin',
unemployed future mother-in-law to deal with, since the house clearly
only belongs to her father.)
William Longyard
2005-10-14 23:22:36 UTC
Permalink
Sounds like none of you have a clue about what this song is really about and
what that girl really is.

Springsteen often creates female characters in his songs to use as narrative
alter-egos. They are his narrator's "other side"- the side of doubt, open
disappointments, lack of pretense, and fear.

Racin' is one of Springsteen's greatest existentialist songs, as is Stolen
Car.

These are masterpieces. Jackson Browne and Warren Zevon are not even in the
same ocean with this guy poetically.

Bill Longyard
Jim Mitchell
2005-10-15 00:00:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by William Longyard
Sounds like none of you have a clue about what this song is really about and
what that girl really is.
Springsteen often creates female characters in his songs to use as narrative
alter-egos. They are his narrator's "other side"- the side of doubt, open
disappointments, lack of pretense, and fear.
Oh dang. Here I thought she was just some good lookin' gal who liked fast
cars and sat around on the porch and bawled a lot.
Robert Wiersema
2005-10-14 23:49:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by William Longyard
Sounds like none of you have a clue about what this song is really about
and what that girl really is.
No, it sounds like you're a pompous fuck.
Post by William Longyard
Springsteen often creates female characters in his songs to use as
narrative alter-egos. They are his narrator's "other side"- the side of
doubt, open disappointments, lack of pretense, and fear.
Sure, it can be read this way.
Or it could be read as a socialist indictment against the clichés of the
American dream.
Or it could be read as a veiled paean to a homosexual relationship lost
amidst the prejudices of mid-seventies America.
Or it could be read in any number of ways... including as a straightforward
narrative.
To say that a narrative reading implies that "none of you have a clue about
what this song is really about" should serve as a reminder, if anyone
needed one, of what a condescending prick you seem to be. I sincerely hope
this is restricted to your on-line persona, safe behind your keyboard, and
is not reflected in your daily life.
Susan
2005-10-15 00:00:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by William Longyard
These are masterpieces. Jackson Browne and Warren Zevon are not even in the
same ocean with this guy poetically.
Bruce can't even carry Jackson or Warren's existential jock strap,
Bill.

neener.

susan
ruth
2005-10-15 02:48:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Susan
Post by William Longyard
These are masterpieces. Jackson Browne and Warren Zevon are not even in the
same ocean with this guy poetically.
Bruce can't even carry Jackson or Warren's existential jock strap,
Bill.
neener.
susan
I'll carry his existential jock strap,

offered Ruth.



( with regards to THE BEAST)
--
Susan
2005-10-15 14:31:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by ruth
Post by Susan
Post by William Longyard
These are masterpieces. Jackson Browne and Warren Zevon are not even in the
same ocean with this guy poetically.
Bruce can't even carry Jackson or Warren's existential jock strap,
Bill.
neener.
susan
I'll carry his existential jock strap,
whose existential jock strap ruth? Bills, Bruce's Jackson's or
Warren's-tho Warren may be out of the contest since he's dead, tho that
may be the ultimate existential reality and jock strap.

queried,
susan
I'll sleep when I'm dead, CO
Post by ruth
offered Ruth.
( with regards to THE BEAST)
--
William Innes
2005-10-15 01:24:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by William Longyard
Sounds like none of you have a clue about what this song is really about
and what that girl really is.
Springsteen often creates female characters in his songs to use as
narrative alter-egos. They are his narrator's "other side"- the side of
doubt, open disappointments, lack of pretense, and fear.
Racin' is one of Springsteen's greatest existentialist songs, as is Stolen
Car.
I'd agree with both statements. Although with Springsteen using females as
an "alter-ego"...I think that has some validity,
but am not entirely sure that it becomes a valid theory until a bit later in
Springsteen's career.
Really, I think a fair statement can be made that there really isn't a hell
of a lot of depth to Springsteen's female characters when one hears his work
from the seventies and early eighties.
I mean, compare Janey in "Spare Parts" to the gal in "Racing in the Street"
if you need an example of one's maturation, emotional growth and ability to
empathize with another gender.
Post by William Longyard
These are masterpieces. Jackson Browne and Warren Zevon are not even in
the same ocean with this guy poetically.
Oh, no.
Poetically they are in the same league.
It's just a different type of poetry...and the world is all the better a
place for it.
Short of a one-off parody ("Tweeter and the Monkey Man"), I really don't
think that Dylan could pen anything quite as equally gut-wrenching or
emotionally draining as Springsteen has (although Dylan has managed to do
this..in his own style and form...with such works as "The Lonesome Death of
Hattie Carroll" and, relatively more recently, "The Man in the Long Black
Coat" ~ "Not Dark Yet" and "Sugar Baby").
And, in turn, I don't think Springsteen has ever managed to capture Dylan's
(as well as Van Morrison's) ability to write with one foot grounded on earth
while the other foot steps into more mystical terrain.

As for Zevon and Browne...geography, substances of choice, lifestyles,
surrounding culture are factors that are going to make any comparison to
Springsteen with them akin to comparing Michelangelo to Hopper to Van Gogh
to Munch. Although all the mentioned artists have enriched our lives
deeply, the world of their respective canvases are worlds unto themselves.
It would be like comparing Patti Smith's HORSES to Wings' BAND ON THE RUN.
Both are great albums...but there isn't really a lot of common ground.

When it comes to art, music, literature, cinema, theater, etc., I really
don't feel a need to justify one person being better than another.
Springsteen will never capture life on the street in the way that Tom Waits
manages...and Waits will never manage to merge the secular and spiritual
worlds in the manner that Leonard Cohen has managed. Each has his/her own
niche.....and it pretty much makes comparisons to be downright juvenile
(after all, we're talking about forms of art...not Superbowl Sunday).
William Longyard
2005-10-15 01:44:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by William Innes
I'd agree with both statements. Although with Springsteen using females as
an "alter-ego"...I think that has some validity,
but am not entirely sure that it becomes a valid theory until a bit later
in Springsteen's career.
This is true. The reason Springsteen's women are not usually alter-egos in
his later career is that he's "out grown" his emotional/psychological need
for them. The break-through came with his second marriage and fatherhood.
Lucky Town and Human Touch are the watershed albums.
Post by William Innes
And, in turn, I don't think Springsteen has ever managed to capture
Dylan's (as well as Van Morrison's) ability to write with one foot
grounded on earth while the other foot steps into more mystical terrain.
Largely agree except for Asbury Park 4th of July, My Beautiful Reward, This
Hard Land, and Across the Border.

Bill Longyard
William Innes
2005-10-15 02:11:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by William Longyard
Post by William Innes
I'd agree with both statements. Although with Springsteen using females
as an "alter-ego"...I think that has some validity,
but am not entirely sure that it becomes a valid theory until a bit later
in Springsteen's career.
This is true. The reason Springsteen's women are not usually alter-egos
in his later career is that he's "out grown" his emotional/psychological
need for them. The break-through came with his second marriage and
fatherhood. Lucky Town and Human Touch are the watershed albums.
Whether they're alter-egos or not in his later (or earlier, for that matter)
works, I reallly don't feel qualified to say.
I'm guessing that could best be answered by the man who penned the songs
himself.
Post by William Longyard
Post by William Innes
And, in turn, I don't think Springsteen has ever managed to capture
Dylan's (as well as Van Morrison's) ability to write with one foot
grounded on earth while the other foot steps into more mystical terrain.
Largely agree except for Asbury Park 4th of July, My Beautiful Reward,
This Hard Land, and Across the Border.
Those songs definitely have an air of mysticism to them, no denying that.
In some cases, Springsteen's entering into that realm of the mystic produces
better results ("Across the Border") than with others ("My Beautiful
Reward").
I guess, for the sake of an update, one could include "Matamoras Banks" as a
song that conveys that sense of having one foot planted in two different
realms.
No, I don't think it's anywhere near as strong a song as "Across the
Border"...but I think the intent/spirit of the song isn't all that
dissimilar.
Zeke
2005-10-15 01:39:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by William Longyard
Sounds like none of you have a clue about what this song is really about
and what that girl really is.
I tawt I awready tol' you? She's cute but her brothers are junkies and her
sisters are hos. She could do anything she wanted but chooses to run around
being taken advantage of while "whoa is me-ing it" w/the fam. Imagine Bruce
knew a few like that back in the day.
Post by William Longyard
Springsteen often creates female characters in his songs to use as
narrative alter-egos. They are his narrator's "other side"- the side of
doubt, open disappointments, lack of pretense, and fear.
Oh jeez. Talk about over-analysis that's "Bullshit 101."
Post by William Longyard
Racin' is one of Springsteen's greatest existentialist songs, as is Stolen
Car.
Define existential. Is that the Sartre existential, the Bellow existential
or some other?
Post by William Longyard
These are masterpieces. Jackson Browne and Warren Zevon are not even in
the same ocean with this guy poetically.
Hyperbole 101


==================================
Better bring your own redemption when you come
To the barricades of Heaven, where I'm from
Jackson Browne
Bluetele
2005-10-15 02:42:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Zeke
Oh jeez. Talk about over-analysis that's "Bullshit 101."
High five, Zeke!

bt
Gumboman
2005-10-15 04:24:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Zeke
Oh jeez. Talk about over-analysis that's "Bullshit 101."
Hyperbole 101
Are you implying that Longyard is still a freshman?


JH
A to Z
2005-10-15 13:50:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gumboman
Post by Zeke
Oh jeez. Talk about over-analysis that's "Bullshit 101."
Hyperbole 101
Are you implying that Longyard is still a freshman?
hey, I took a bunch of 101 courses as a senior:
math 101 (and 102)
computer science 101
meteorology 101
political geography 101

when you need 15 credits of math and science to graduate, you do what you
can...

Though I did feel strange taking a math course in my senior year of college
that was less advanced than my 5th grade course work.
Gumboman
2005-10-15 14:47:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by A to Z
Post by Gumboman
Post by Zeke
Oh jeez. Talk about over-analysis that's "Bullshit 101."
Hyperbole 101
Are you implying that Longyard is still a freshman?
math 101 (and 102)
computer science 101
meteorology 101
political geography 101
when you need 15 credits of math and science to graduate, you do what you
can...
Though I did feel strange taking a math course in my senior year of college
that was less advanced than my 5th grade course work.
I've known for a long time that Longyard skipped those math classes.



JH
gully
2005-10-15 14:30:38 UTC
Permalink
The question really is how colleges allow a class titled political
geagraphy count as a science class.
I once took a class "Economic geography of the mineral Industry of the
world" (assumed that of the world was there to distinguish it from
'econ geog of saskatchewan') I took it because it was a two hour class
and that was all I needed to graduate.
Only "d" i ever got in college, and this was in the summer of '68 and
the instructor, a full prof, told a really offensive racist joke. Not
offensive funny, really offensive.
Gumboman
2005-10-15 04:22:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by William Longyard
Sounds like none of you have a clue about what this song is really about
and what that girl really is.
Springsteen often creates female characters in his songs to use as
narrative alter-egos. They are his narrator's "other side"- the side of
doubt, open disappointments, lack of pretense, and fear.
Racin' is one of Springsteen's greatest existentialist songs, as is Stolen
Car.
I never did see anything so great about Stolen Car either ..............



JH
William Innes
2005-10-15 04:21:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gumboman
Post by William Longyard
Sounds like none of you have a clue about what this song is really about
and what that girl really is.
Springsteen often creates female characters in his songs to use as
narrative alter-egos. They are his narrator's "other side"- the side of
doubt, open disappointments, lack of pretense, and fear.
Racin' is one of Springsteen's greatest existentialist songs, as is
Stolen Car.
I never did see anything so great about Stolen Car either ..............
Oh, man....I think that one is every bit as much a masterpiece...if not more
of one...as "Racing in the Street."
First off, it's eerie as hell (talking about the version on THE
RIVER).....it's as understated as it can be.
And that long midnight road seems to go on forever...driving right off of
THE RIVER onto the New Jersey turnpike in "State Trooper."
It's not always a fun thing to hear/give a listen...but when it comes to
reaching an objective, achieving what the mood, sentiment and pathos that it
strives for.....that song nails it.
Zeke
2005-10-15 07:02:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by William Innes
Oh, man....I think that one is every bit as much a masterpiece...if not
more of one...as "Racing in the Street."
First off, it's eerie as hell (talking about the version on THE
RIVER).....it's as understated as it can be.
And that long midnight road seems to go on forever...driving right off of
THE RIVER onto the New Jersey turnpike in "State Trooper."
It's not always a fun thing to hear/give a listen...but when it comes to
reaching an objective, achieving what the mood, sentiment and pathos that
it strives for.....that song nails it.
Agreed on "album version" of Stolen Car.
It's easily one of his 5 or 10 best ever songs.


==================================
Better bring your own redemption when you come
To the barricades of Heaven, where I'm from
Jackson Browne
cwb
2005-10-15 14:26:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by William Innes
Post by Gumboman
I never did see anything so great about Stolen Car either ..............
Oh, man....I think that one is every bit as much a masterpiece...if not more
of one...as "Racing in the Street."
I love/admire/agree on both, but yeah, I'll definitely take "stolen
car" if we're choosing.
Post by William Innes
First off, it's eerie as hell (talking about the version on THE
RIVER).....it's as understated as it can be.
it makes my top five bruce songs every time. and that's really saying
something.

no bombast, just brilliance.


cwb
(last night she read those letters)
Gumboman
2005-10-15 04:21:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by jnjmitch
Post by Zeke
Post by jnjmitch
I don't know- by the last line, he's up to his old tricks again of
racing in the street. How long do you think she's going to put up with
that before she's back on her daddy's porch?
And that's another problem, what's she doing living w/her daddy?
Wasn't he like 28 or something when he wrote that song?
She doesn't sound like much of a catch- she left some dude from LA for
no other reason than because she met a different guy with a faster car,
she's prone to fits of melancholia until he gives up his hobbies for
her, and she does little else but sit on the porch where she lives as
an adult child with her father, whom she still refers to as "daddy".
No wonder he wants to spend the rest of his summer racing in the
street. She'd better be careful, because Bobby's ex-wife up the block
might start looking pretty good. (At least he doesn't have a yackin',
unemployed future mother-in-law to deal with, since the house clearly
only belongs to her father.)
Good synopsis................


JH
Kevin McClave
2005-10-14 21:06:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by jnjmitch
Post by Zeke
The song improves dramatically with the next stanza (about all the shutdown
strangers, which of course includes the girl so there's an argument both are
necessary).
I don't know- by the last line, he's up to his old tricks again of
racing in the street. How long do you think she's going to put up with
that before she's back on her daddy's porch?
To me, RITS is like The Godfather- dark and depressing, but in a
brilliant way. You're getting a glimpse into someone's soul- your
own?- with them. I can't listen/watch too often, but when I do, it's a
transcendent experience.
the 1985 versions with spoken intro were magnificent.

"Sometimes people, they expect too much from each other..."

********************************************************************
Kevin McClave
www.kpmcclave.com/splash.html

"Courage, the footstool of the Virtues, upon which
they stand." ~Robert Louis Stevenson
********************************************************************
William Innes
2005-10-14 23:12:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kevin McClave
Post by jnjmitch
Post by Zeke
The song improves dramatically with the next stanza (about all the shutdown
strangers, which of course includes the girl so there's an argument both are
necessary).
I don't know- by the last line, he's up to his old tricks again of
racing in the street. How long do you think she's going to put up with
that before she's back on her daddy's porch?
To me, RITS is like The Godfather- dark and depressing, but in a
brilliant way. You're getting a glimpse into someone's soul- your
own?- with them. I can't listen/watch too often, but when I do, it's a
transcendent experience.
the 1985 versions with spoken intro were magnificent.
"Sometimes people, they expect too much from each other..."
I fear that Springsteen learned that lesson the hard way...as probably many
of us did.
Man, I still remember the day I brought home the BORN TO RUN album.....and
was so blown away by "Thunder Road" that I sat my mom down to listen to it
while reading along with the lyrics. Suddenly tears welled up in her eyes.
Me, I asked her what the matter was, I did.
She said something along the lines of how it sound as though he's looking
for something in someone else...and when a person does that, they usually
let you down.
It would take me a good 15 years or so before I realized just how right she
was.
It would take me another six or seven years to happily have her words proven
to be not always the case.
ruth
2005-10-15 02:44:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gumboman
Post by William Longyard
Browne couldn't even come close to Racin' in the Street,
Explain this to me. What is so great about this song?
JH
Everything. Absolutely everything. It is one song I never tire of and it
makes me shiver every time.
--
Gumboman
2005-10-15 04:35:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by ruth
Post by Gumboman
Post by William Longyard
Browne couldn't even come close to Racin' in the Street,
Explain this to me. What is so great about this song?
JH
Everything. Absolutely everything. It is one song I never tire of and it
makes me shiver every time.
--
And the way you two have been carrying on I thought it was Longyard that
made you shiver.


JH
William Innes
2005-10-15 04:17:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by ruth
Post by Gumboman
Post by William Longyard
Browne couldn't even come close to Racin' in the Street,
Explain this to me. What is so great about this song?
JH
Everything. Absolutely everything. It is one song I never tire of and it
makes me shiver every time.
--
It has the same effect on me...even when done with the twang thang in his
voice.
He's written many an epic...and many of them are wonderfully overblown
epics/anthems...but this one is so subtle, but every bit as powerful as
those more arena-friendly epics (you know, the ones that have the crowd
pumping fists into the air or, lord forbid, have the crowd sing along).

The song has aged well....but I fear that, perhaps, I haven't.
When I first heard the song, I felt an incredible amount of sympathy for the
folks in that song.
I just don't feel that for them any longer.
Perhaps a lot of it comes from having grown up in a city where so many
folks...much like the ones described in "Racing in the Street"...reside.
They make their choices.....and they often squander their opportunities.
And, hey, this is coming from a guy who had a brother who could have been
the blueprint for the song's main character.
My bro was hell on wheels....lived to work on his car......lived to race it
in the streets.
Yeah, irony of ironies...he's the one who became the chief/commander of one
of the Bay Area's CHP Offices.
So, where I once felt a great deal of sympathy....my heart just doesn't
reach out to those folks in the same way that it once did.
With Springsteen's music, I find myself feeling more sympathy these days for
the folks who reside in songs such as "American Skin (41 Shots)".
Their plight is as random and senseless as that of a foul-ball hitting
someone in a baseball stadium....and that makes them a bit more tragic to
me.
As for the folks in "Racing in the Street"...okay, so working on the Chevy
seemed as though it would do the trick, but it wound up falling a bit short.
I'm sure there were many folks who'd been down similar roads who probably
tried to warn them of the downward spiral such choices would offer....and
obviously no heed was taken to such warnings. So it goes...
William Longyard
2005-10-15 04:56:32 UTC
Permalink
Bill I.,

This song isn't about the characters on the street, it's about the fears
inside the narrator's head. What is found "crushed and dying in the dirt"
is the narrator's optimism in the future. His "hope" is dead. This is
existentialist angst. This theme runs through many of Springsteen's songs.
His is a constant struggle "to find at the end of every hard earned
day...some reason to believe." To believe that life is worth living one
more day. "To be or not to be. That is the question."

Bill Longyard
Post by William Innes
Post by ruth
Post by Gumboman
Post by William Longyard
Browne couldn't even come close to Racin' in the Street,
Explain this to me. What is so great about this song?
JH
Everything. Absolutely everything. It is one song I never tire of and it
makes me shiver every time.
--
It has the same effect on me...even when done with the twang thang in his
voice.
He's written many an epic...and many of them are wonderfully overblown
epics/anthems...but this one is so subtle, but every bit as powerful as
those more arena-friendly epics (you know, the ones that have the crowd
pumping fists into the air or, lord forbid, have the crowd sing along).
The song has aged well....but I fear that, perhaps, I haven't.
When I first heard the song, I felt an incredible amount of sympathy for
the folks in that song.
I just don't feel that for them any longer.
Perhaps a lot of it comes from having grown up in a city where so many
folks...much like the ones described in "Racing in the Street"...reside.
They make their choices.....and they often squander their opportunities.
And, hey, this is coming from a guy who had a brother who could have been
the blueprint for the song's main character.
My bro was hell on wheels....lived to work on his car......lived to race
it in the streets.
Yeah, irony of ironies...he's the one who became the chief/commander of
one of the Bay Area's CHP Offices.
So, where I once felt a great deal of sympathy....my heart just doesn't
reach out to those folks in the same way that it once did.
With Springsteen's music, I find myself feeling more sympathy these days
for the folks who reside in songs such as "American Skin (41 Shots)".
Their plight is as random and senseless as that of a foul-ball hitting
someone in a baseball stadium....and that makes them a bit more tragic to
me.
As for the folks in "Racing in the Street"...okay, so working on the Chevy
seemed as though it would do the trick, but it wound up falling a bit short.
I'm sure there were many folks who'd been down similar roads who probably
tried to warn them of the downward spiral such choices would offer....and
obviously no heed was taken to such warnings. So it goes...
William Innes
2005-10-15 05:36:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by William Longyard
Bill I.,
This song isn't about the characters on the street, it's about the fears
inside the narrator's head. What is found "crushed and dying in the dirt"
is the narrator's optimism in the future. His "hope" is dead. This is
existentialist angst. This theme runs through many of Springsteen's
songs. His is a constant struggle "to find at the end of every hard earned
day...some reason to believe." To believe that life is worth living one
more day. "To be or not to be. That is the question."
I realize that. When one digs and delves, for sure, it is much much deeper
and has layers of depth that go beyond the characters and setting of the
song.
However, the devil is often in the details...and it is with the details that
I find the pointed and poignant point that you make about this song often
alludes me.
Regarding his "reason to believe"...well, in Springsteen's case ~ with
"Racing in the Street" and a number of other songs from this era, the
nihilism is such that I sometimes find it unbearable.
If he is going to make such nihilistic statements...and I have no problem
with him doing so...then it's sort of incumbent upon him to paint a
songscape that allows the listener to buy into it hook, line and sinker.
The song does succeed.
But I think more recent works...."Black Cowboys" and "American Skin"
probably succeed a bit better towards achieving this objective.
Post by William Longyard
Post by William Innes
Post by ruth
Post by Gumboman
Post by William Longyard
Browne couldn't even come close to Racin' in the Street,
Explain this to me. What is so great about this song?
JH
Everything. Absolutely everything. It is one song I never tire of and it
makes me shiver every time.
--
It has the same effect on me...even when done with the twang thang in his
voice.
He's written many an epic...and many of them are wonderfully overblown
epics/anthems...but this one is so subtle, but every bit as powerful as
those more arena-friendly epics (you know, the ones that have the crowd
pumping fists into the air or, lord forbid, have the crowd sing along).
The song has aged well....but I fear that, perhaps, I haven't.
When I first heard the song, I felt an incredible amount of sympathy for
the folks in that song.
I just don't feel that for them any longer.
Perhaps a lot of it comes from having grown up in a city where so many
folks...much like the ones described in "Racing in the Street"...reside.
They make their choices.....and they often squander their opportunities.
And, hey, this is coming from a guy who had a brother who could have been
the blueprint for the song's main character.
My bro was hell on wheels....lived to work on his car......lived to race
it in the streets.
Yeah, irony of ironies...he's the one who became the chief/commander of
one of the Bay Area's CHP Offices.
So, where I once felt a great deal of sympathy....my heart just doesn't
reach out to those folks in the same way that it once did.
With Springsteen's music, I find myself feeling more sympathy these days
for the folks who reside in songs such as "American Skin (41 Shots)".
Their plight is as random and senseless as that of a foul-ball hitting
someone in a baseball stadium....and that makes them a bit more tragic to
me.
As for the folks in "Racing in the Street"...okay, so working on the
Chevy seemed as though it would do the trick, but it wound up falling a
bit short.
I'm sure there were many folks who'd been down similar roads who probably
tried to warn them of the downward spiral such choices would offer....and
obviously no heed was taken to such warnings. So it goes...
William Longyard
2005-10-15 05:39:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by William Innes
The song does succeed.
But I think more recent works...."Black Cowboys" and "American Skin"
probably succeed a bit better towards achieving this objective.
I don't understand your point here. To me those are songs about social
issues, not a personal spiritual crisis.

Bill Longyard
William Innes
2005-10-15 16:37:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by William Longyard
Post by William Innes
The song does succeed.
But I think more recent works...."Black Cowboys" and "American Skin"
probably succeed a bit better towards achieving this objective.
I don't understand your point here. To me those are songs about social
issues, not a personal spiritual crisis.
Mr. Longyard, as an esteemed colleague (and one whom I hold in the highest
regard when it comes to our shared profession), I have to ask you this:
Do you really think there is all that great a difference of personal
outcomes when it comes to social issues and a spiritual crisis?
I have found, more often than not, that the two often bleed over into one
another...
Burton Busk
2005-10-15 11:26:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by William Innes
With Springsteen's music, I find myself feeling more sympathy these days for
the folks who reside in songs such as "American Skin (41 Shots)".
Their plight is as random and senseless as that of a foul-ball hitting
someone in a baseball stadium
Even more random that that. Hey man, you gotta bring your mitt to the
ballgame, and fucking pay attention!
cwb
2005-10-15 14:28:22 UTC
Permalink
so I guess I should buy it huh?





<g>


cwb
(side of the road)
Ken Ream
2005-10-14 09:31:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by William Longyard
Browne couldn't even come close to Racin' in the Street, Price You Pay,
Darkness, or Backstreets. However, Browne is always earnest. Kind of like
Edward Herman is an actor.
Bill Longyard
Off the top of my head, I'd rate "The Pretender", "Late For the Sky" and
"Sky Blue and Black" better than any of those songs. Only "Backstreets"
gives them serious competiton.

This is kind of fun. Can we do Warren Zevon next?

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Susan
2005-10-14 13:39:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ken Ream
Post by William Longyard
Browne couldn't even come close to Racin' in the Street, Price You Pay,
Darkness, or Backstreets. However, Browne is always earnest. Kind of like
Edward Herman is an actor.
Bill Longyard
Off the top of my head, I'd rate "The Pretender", "Late For the Sky" and
"Sky Blue and Black" better than any of those songs. Only "Backstreets"
gives them serious competiton.
This is kind of fun. Can we do Warren Zevon next?
that's a rhetorical question, for me! :) of course we can:

Hasten Down the Wind, Carmelita, Desperados under the Eaves, Werewolves
of London (Bruce has never come close in the humor category with
Zevon), Veracruz, Tenderness on the Block, etc. etc. etc. That was
just from the 70's-I'd argue that Zevon may have maintained a higher
quality of songwriting thru the 80's and 90's than Browne or Bruce did.

I listen to more JB or WZ than Bruce, that's been true for me for the
last decade or so....

susan
they'll be rockin in the projects, CO
Susan
2005-10-14 13:43:04 UTC
Permalink
p.s. I wasn't listing the Zevon songs as better than the Bruce songs,
just in the same league.

I refuse to choose. :)
Post by Susan
Post by Ken Ream
Post by William Longyard
Browne couldn't even come close to Racin' in the Street, Price You Pay,
Darkness, or Backstreets. However, Browne is always earnest. Kind of like
Edward Herman is an actor.
Bill Longyard
Off the top of my head, I'd rate "The Pretender", "Late For the Sky" and
"Sky Blue and Black" better than any of those songs. Only "Backstreets"
gives them serious competiton.
This is kind of fun. Can we do Warren Zevon next?
Hasten Down the Wind, Carmelita, Desperados under the Eaves, Werewolves
of London (Bruce has never come close in the humor category with
Zevon), Veracruz, Tenderness on the Block, etc. etc. etc. That was
just from the 70's-I'd argue that Zevon may have maintained a higher
quality of songwriting thru the 80's and 90's than Browne or Bruce did.
I listen to more JB or WZ than Bruce, that's been true for me for the
last decade or so....
susan
they'll be rockin in the projects, CO
Susan
2005-10-14 14:21:13 UTC
Permalink
Susan wrote:
Werewolves
Post by Susan
of London (Bruce has never come close in the humor category with
Zevon),
continuing my monologue:

Other than Zevon, I experience much humor, more out loud laughter and
involuntary smiles while listening to Dylan, who has one of the dryest,
most bizarre, but strongest senses of humor I've ever come across in a
songwriter. I don't know (or know if I care) if he's deliberate in it,
but it's wonderful. I think it's often because of his dry, clear,
somewhat cynical view of the world, but he can just crack me up.
Richard Thompson's like that too. I'm sure that's one big reason why
Zevon, Thompson and Dylan will hold a permanent special place in my
rock n roll soul forever-it's because they find and extract the
ridiculous.

:o)

susan
jnjmitch
2005-10-14 15:23:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Susan
Werewolves
Post by Susan
of London (Bruce has never come close in the humor category with
Zevon),
Other than Zevon, I experience much humor, more out loud laughter and
involuntary smiles while listening to Dylan, who has one of the dryest,
most bizarre, but strongest senses of humor I've ever come across in a
songwriter. I don't know (or know if I care) if he's deliberate in it,
but it's wonderful. I think it's often because of his dry, clear,
somewhat cynical view of the world, but he can just crack me up.
Richard Thompson's like that too. I'm sure that's one big reason why
Zevon, Thompson and Dylan will hold a permanent special place in my
rock n roll soul forever-it's because they find and extract the
ridiculous.
:o)
susan
Yeah, Dylan makes me laugh too. I just bought the new updated lyrics
book, and his humor is much more evident (to me anyway) in writing than
when sung. I've always loved Cameron Crowe's liner notes to Biograph,
where he talks about imagining the costume party with all of the
characters from Dylan's songs- that seems to capture the humor in his
lyrics as much as anything.

I've always found Bruce's intentional humor to be kind of forced and
awkward. Honestly, sometimes the things he jokes about onstage or
(rarely) in song don't even make a whole lot of sense. His funniest
moments seem to be when he messes up a song or something else goes
wrong on stage. In those cases, he's forced to let his guard down and
comes across as much more genuine. I'm not saying that he isn't a
funny or likable guy, but I don't think that he should quit his day job
to do stand up.
William Innes
2005-10-14 23:07:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Susan
Werewolves
Post by Susan
of London (Bruce has never come close in the humor category with
Zevon),
Other than Zevon, I experience much humor, more out loud laughter and
involuntary smiles while listening to Dylan, who has one of the dryest,
most bizarre, but strongest senses of humor I've ever come across in a
songwriter. I don't know (or know if I care) if he's deliberate in it,
but it's wonderful. I think it's often because of his dry, clear,
somewhat cynical view of the world, but he can just crack me up.
Richard Thompson's like that too. I'm sure that's one big reason why
Zevon, Thompson and Dylan will hold a permanent special place in my
rock n roll soul forever-it's because they find and extract the
ridiculous.
Dylan's sense of humor has been pretty apparent from the word "go".

Man, I still listen to some of his early "talkin'-blues" songs...and there
are lines that have me laughing out loud.
"Bear Mountain Picnic" has humor so sly and subtle...but it doesn't diminish
one iota from how hilarious a song it is.
And, then, with LOVE AND THEFT, there are tons of lines that can bring a
smile or chuckle to one.

Same with Zevon, too. That guy could be downright sardonic...but, man, I
sure did dig it while it lasted.
Gumboman
2005-10-14 15:05:01 UTC
Permalink
So have you heard the new CD? If it's all from the solo tour is it worth
buying since there were some pretty good boots out of those shows?


JH
Post by Susan
Post by Ken Ream
Post by William Longyard
Browne couldn't even come close to Racin' in the Street, Price You Pay,
Darkness, or Backstreets. However, Browne is always earnest. Kind of like
Edward Herman is an actor.
Bill Longyard
Off the top of my head, I'd rate "The Pretender", "Late For the Sky" and
"Sky Blue and Black" better than any of those songs. Only "Backstreets"
gives them serious competiton.
This is kind of fun. Can we do Warren Zevon next?
Hasten Down the Wind, Carmelita, Desperados under the Eaves, Werewolves
of London (Bruce has never come close in the humor category with
Zevon), Veracruz, Tenderness on the Block, etc. etc. etc. That was
just from the 70's-I'd argue that Zevon may have maintained a higher
quality of songwriting thru the 80's and 90's than Browne or Bruce did.
I listen to more JB or WZ than Bruce, that's been true for me for the
last decade or so....
susan
they'll be rockin in the projects, CO
Susan
2005-10-14 15:21:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gumboman
So have you heard the new CD? If it's all from the solo tour is it worth
buying since there were some pretty good boots out of those shows?
I haven't heard it yet-I was at my favorite used/new CD store yesterday
and almost bought it but didn't. They only had new copies available,
and wrong as it may be, I probably won't end up buying it until it ends
up in the used bin. And extra wrong as it may be, that's probably
because there are good boots of his solo tour out there. (Hey, I'm
honest) My reality is that there's close to no money in the budget for
new music-it's a luxury. I buy maybe 2 or 3 new releases per year.
Tracy Chapman's got a new CD out, and I'll probably be buying hers
pretty soon. She's a type of great, but underrewarded artist who I
like to support by buying their new stuff, new. Jesse Malin's like
that too. I picked up a used copy of Richard Thompson latest disc
yesterday instead (the store didn't have Tracy's newest) instead.

susan
Ken Ream
2005-10-14 21:01:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Susan
Post by Gumboman
So have you heard the new CD? If it's all from the solo tour is it worth
buying since there were some pretty good boots out of those shows?
The sounds much better than the best of the boots out there. And I've
noticed that on many of the last few years worth of solo acoustic boots,
Jackson screws up a song or two every and stops and restarts (that can
happen when you're not relying on a teleprompter). These performances
are all good takes. He does jokingly acknowledge his habit of screwing
up songs on one of the intros though.
Post by Susan
I haven't heard it yet-I was at my favorite used/new CD store yesterday
and almost bought it but didn't. They only had new copies available,
and wrong as it may be, I probably won't end up buying it until it ends
up in the used bin.
Note that the Best Buy ad claimed an exclusive bonus track. The bonus
track is a nice piano version of "The Rebel Jesus" and its listed as a
"bonus" on the CD sleeve. I don't know if its really exclusive (I know
its on some European versions) but you might want to check to make sure
the track is on the disc before you buy it elsewhere if that's important
to you.
Post by Susan
susan
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Susan
2005-10-14 23:53:14 UTC
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Post by Ken Ream
Note that the Best Buy ad claimed an exclusive bonus track. The bonus
track is a nice piano version of "The Rebel Jesus" and its listed as a
"bonus" on the CD sleeve. I don't know if its really exclusive (I know
its on some European versions) but you might want to check to make sure
the track is on the disc before you buy it elsewhere if that's important
to you.
thanks for the pointer regarding the BB bonus track-potentially at
least. I'd really like that version of the Rebel Jesus. I'l scope
them out this weekend for the new Chapman CD and maybe go overboard and
get the new JB too. (that would put me up to 5 new releases this year,
if I do. GOING CRA-ZY! :}

susan
William Innes
2005-10-14 03:44:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by ruth
Post by Zeke
Post by William Longyard
I can't think of one JB song that is even in the same league with what
Bruce writes. JB writes earnest poetry, Springsteen writes inspired
masterpieces.
Once again you're wrong.
Actually, although it pains me to say so.... I agree with Longyard.
--
Well, as performers go, I remember reading once somewhere that Springsteen's
ballads rock harder than Browne's rockers.
But that's really neither here nor there as far as one's songwriting
abilities go.

Since the LAWYERS IN LOVE album (which, for me, marked the beginnig of a
corrosion of Browne's wonderful skills as a songwriter...although others
might argue that such a downward sprial began with his HOLD OUT album), I
have to say that....even with an improvement in songwriting in recent
years...Jackson Browne's best days as a songwriter definitely came in the
1970s and early 1980s.

Springsteen and Browne, they are two different cats.
I mean, really, this is almost like comparing Leonard Cohen to David
Bowie...it's just not a ground where there's a level-playing field, because
the playing fields are so vastly different.

But, when hearing songs such as "For a Dancer" ~ "For Everyman" ~ "These
Days" ~ "Running on Empty" ~ "Late for the Sky" ~ "Before the Deluge" ~
"Sleep's Dark and Silent Gate" ~ "Linda Paloma" ~ "Fountain of Sorrow" ~
"Our Lady of the Well" ~ "Rock Me on the Water" ~ "The Pretender"...and
those are just the first ones that popped into my head....there's just no
way I can discount the incredible depth and quality of many of Jackson
Browne's finest songs.
They are treasures, pure and simple.
m***@yahoo.com
2005-10-13 12:33:43 UTC
Permalink
I like it. It is a little be like Storytellers, there is an
introduction before just about every song. It is as noted solo
acoustic, and Jackson's voice sounds as good as ever. The Vol. 1
notation on the CD title makes me hopeful for a Vol. 2 somewhere down
the road. Recommended.

Mike in St Louis
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